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Amazing distinct tree houses that people live in

Just recently in Papua, people of the Korowai tribe were spotted living in the top of the tree at 100ft height. Have you ever pictured in living in a house at the top of a 100ft tree. Certainly no because it is rather dangerous and no one loves to have fun with their lives. However these tribal individuals are understood to live happily in these tree homes with their households and their animals . They even carry their animal on their hands and bring them on the top of the tree to let them live with their masters.

So search for Korowai tribe you always needed.

If you’re trying to check for houses in the trees, you have land on the appropriate blog post.

Aerial view of a recently abandoned tree house. This was the tallest tree house we found in eight hours of surveying Korowai country by airplane and helicopter, and five weeks of hiking in the forest. From the ground we estimated it to be 50 meters tall. Its owner, Landi Gifanop, built it so tall “to see the planes, the helicopters, and the mountains, but mainly to keep sorcerers from climbing my stairs.” He abandoned it because the wind kept ruining his roof and he feared the whole house would come down. His new house is on the ground. This picture was taken as part of an expedition for GEO Magazine and National Geographic Magazine to document the way of life of the Korowai tribe. Most of the Korowai in these photos had never had prior contact with anyone outside of their language group, and have no material goods from the outside world. They live in tree houses built above the forest floor to protect themselves from outsiders. The Korowai believe that contact with outsiders will bring an end to their culture. Cannibalism has been part of their traditional system of criminal justice to avenge the death of their clansmen, but the practice is dying out and is outlawed by the Indonesian government. The Korowai believe that most natural deaths are caused by sorcery, and must be avenged by the death (and consumption) of the person responsible.

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Domaleh, of the Sayah clan, climbs a breadfruit tree to dislodge its fruit with a long stick. This picture was taken as part of an expedition for GEO Magazine and National Geographic Magazine to document the way of life of the Korowai tribe. Most of the Korowai in these photos had never had prior contact with anyone outside of their language group, and have no material goods from the outside world. They live in tree houses built above the forest floor to protect themselves from outsiders. The Korowai believe that contact with outsiders will bring an end to their culture. Cannibalism has been part of their traditional system of criminal justice to avenge the death of their clansmen, but the practice is dying out and is outlawed by the Indonesian government. The Korowai believe that most natural deaths are caused by sorcery, and must be avenged by the death (and consumption) of the person responsible.

Sowayen climbing down a “yambim” or ironwood tree after knocking loose a nest of black ants that he uses for fish bait. The Korowai are superb climbers, and get up thick trees like this by gripping vines with their hands and splayed toes. It took him about a minute to get up this tree, and it took Neeld Messler, a rope expert, over an hour to rig this tree with ropes so the photographer could climb it safely. In the lower left corner Sayah is watching. One of their fishing methods is to put a piece of an ant nest in the water and wait for the fish to come and eat the drowning ants. The fisherman hides behind foliage on the river bank, and shoots the fish with a four-pointed arrow. This picture was taken as part of an expedition for GEO Magazine and National Geographic Magazine to document the way of life of the Korowai tribe. Most of the Korowai in these photos had never had prior contact with anyone outside of their language group, and have no material goods from the outside world. They live in tree houses built above the forest floor to protect themselves from outsiders. The Korowai believe that contact with outsiders will bring an end to their culture. Cannibalism has been part of their traditional system of criminal justice to avenge the death of their clansmen, but the practice is dying out and is outlawed by the Indonesian government. The Korowai believe that most natural deaths are caused by sorcery, and must be avenged by the death (and consumption) of the person responsible.

A sago grub feast arranged for French tourists. The hosts of the feast are standing in a circle in the foreground, and exchange mock attacks with their guests before entering the feast house. (The tour group was on the edge of the clearing and not visible in this photo.) Group tourism started in the early 1990s in Korowai country, and generally consists of 3-4 groups per year of 10-15 tourists per group. The typical program is about a week of looking at various aspects of Korowai life; building a tree house, harvesting a sago tree, hunting in the forest, and culminates with a sago feast. Tourism brings roughly as much money into Korowai country as the former Dutch mission did, but is affecting the Korowai in different ways. All of the sacred parts of the festival were omitted, and the tourists brought in a lot of material goods to distribute freely. I was told by the Indonesian tour operator that most tour groups dance naked with the Korowai; the men tying their penis with a leaf, and the women wearing nothing but a grass skirt. Many of the attendees of this feast were the tour group’s porters and their relatives, who were asked to remove their clothes to give the tourists a “primitive” experience. This picture was taken as part of an expedition for GEO Magazine and National Geographic Magazine to document the way of life of the Korowai tribe. Most of the Korowai in these photos had never had prior contact with anyone outside of their language group, and have no material goods from the outside world. They live in tree houses built above the forest floor to protect themselves from outsiders. The Korowai believe that contact with outsiders will bring an end to their culture. Cannibalism has been part of their traditional system of criminal justice to avenge the death of their clansmen, but the practice is dying out and is outlawed by the Indonesian government. The Korowai believe that most natural deaths are caused by sorcery, and must be avenged by the death (and consumption) of the person responsible.
photo:Lost At E Minor, George Steinmetz

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